Our Coffees

Our curated selection of seasonal speciality coffees. Hand-roasted to order for you every Wednesday. Shipped fresh within 24 hours.
Ethiopia: Magarrisa Lot #3, Heirlom - Washed - Guji Region

Ethiopia: Magarrisa Lot #3, Heirlom - Washed - Guji Region

From €14

In the cup: Complex, and fruit driven acidity and sweetness. Sweet lemon and nectarine flavours, fruity, but without being sour or overly acidic. Underneath, a mix of floral fragrances - jasmine, honeysuckle and bergamot.

Cupping Score: 88

Mouthfeel: Light to medium

Variety: Heirloom

Process: Fully Washed 

Washing Station: Egubaya Station, Israel Degfa

Microlot: Magarrisa Lot #3

Farmers: The coffee itself is grown by a number of small farmers in the area surrounding the washing station. The bring the coffee they have harvested in tiny amounts to the washing station on a daily basis, where it is checked for quality and then graded and processed. The farmers are free to sell their harvest wherever they choose, but they choose to work with Israel as his commitment to quality means they fetch the best prices by selling to him.

Altitude: 2200 metres above sea leve

Origin: Egu Abaye washing station

Egu Abaye smallholders

Privately owned communal wetmill in Egu Abaye area of Guji – by Israel Degfa. He owns 26 washing stations and a farm, across the South and South West of Ethiopia.

Many of Israel's washing stations are great just because of the location and altitude etc, but he is also investing in better systems and protocols in many of them. We are also buying improved naturals, honey coffees, and shade dried coffees from these washing stations.

Every day of production they are differentiating what goes in to the improved and better qualities (grade 1) from what’s a normal preparation for grade 2 and grade 3s. He has invested in flotations systems for cherries and systematically separate some of the coffees for better performance on site. These coffees are taken better care of by an assigned quality team. They generally do lot separation based on 150 bags of parchment, equal to 100 bags of greens. But they often do smaller lot sizes as well when they do honey, shade or other improved preparations.

At the washing station

The farmers:

Some hundreds smallholder farmers delivering tiny amounts of cherries daily to the communal washing station.

On average farmers are having a farm size of less than 1 hectares. Most coffees are organic by default. Organic compost is common, pruning less common. A farmer can typically have less than 1500 trees pr hectar, and 1 tree is typically producing cherries equal to less than 100 - 200 grams of green coffee.

Cultivars:

A mix of local improved variety’s like Certo and local Wolisho . Such as native coffee of forest origin transferred to family smallholder plots. The varieties are referred to collectively as Ethiopian Heirloom, which is a myriad of local native Typica hybrids and new improved varietals based on the old strains.

 

Production process (washed):

Pulper: Traditional Agarde disc pulper

Fermentation: 24-72 hours wet.

Washed and graded in channels: Yes

Soaking: about 6 Hours in clean water.

Drying time: 9-12 days

Whole ripe cherries are hand sorted for unripes and overripes by the farmers before they go into production. They are pulped by a disk pulper and graded in to 1st and 2nd quality in the pulpers density channels. The parchment is then fermented under water for about 48 hours, depending on the weather conditions. After which graded in the washing channels by water flow that again separates the coffee by density. Its then soaked 6 - 24 hrs in fresh, clean water before it’s moved to the drying tables

Drying:

The parchments is dried in the sun for about 12 - 15 days, depending on the weather conditions, on raised African drying beds. For the premium grades they will continuously sort the parchment at the drying tables. Coffees are covered in shade nets during midday and at night.

Ethiopia - Warqee Microlot #6 - Fully Washed

Ethiopia - Warqee Microlot #6 - Fully Washed

From €13,90

In the cup: a complex array of aromas and a smoothy velvety mouthfeel with flavour notes of dried orange, citrus fruit and a delicate undertone of rooibos (redbush) tea. Floral notes like orange blossom and hints of rose.

Cupping Score: 88

Mouthfeel: Medium, velvety

Variety: Heirloom

Process: Fully Washed 

Washing Station: Gigessa, Guji

Microlot: Warqee, Lot #6

Altitude: 1900 metres above sea leve

Background:

Danbi Uddo smallholders

Privately owned communal wetmill in Danbi Uddo – Shakiso, collecting cherries from variouse smallholders.

This washingstation is owned by Faysel Abdosh. It’s a brand new wet mill in Shakiso that opened in 2014. They are already producing 8 containers of washed coffees and 7 containers of naturals. The grades will vary, and we are selecting the grade 1’s that also meets our expectations on the flavor attributes. They generally do lot separation based on 150 bags of parchment, equalt to 100 bags of greens.

The farmers:

About 850 smallholder farmers delivering tiny amounts of cherries daily to the wet miller.

On average farmers are having a farm size of less than 1 hectares. Most coffees are organic by default. Organic compost is common, pruning less common. A farmer can typically have less than 1500 trees pr hectar, and 1 tree is typically producing cherries equal to less than 100 - 200 grams of green coffee.

Cultivars:

A mix of local variety’s. Such as native coffee of forest origin transferred to family smallholder plots. The varieties are referred to collectively as Ethiopian Heirloom, which is a myriad of local native Typica hybrids and new improved varietals based on the old strains.

Production process (washed):

Pulper: Traditional Agarde disc pulper

Fermentation: 36 – 48 hours wet.

Washed and graded in channels: Yes

Soaking: about 24 Hours in clean water.

Drying time:10-12 days

Whole ripe cherries are hand sorted for unripes and overripes by the farmers before they go into production. They are pulped by a disk pulper and graded in the pulper by density: The parchment is then fermented under water for 24-48 hours, depending on the weather conditions. After which graded in the washing channels by water flow that separates the coffee by density. Its then soaked 12-24 hrs in fresh, clean water before it’s moved to the drying tables

Drying:

Skin drying the first hours unders shade. The parchments is dried in the sun for about 10-12 days, depending on the weather conditions, on African drying beds. Coffees are covered in shade nets during midday and at night.

Soil:

Red brown, fertile and well drained

 

Burundi: Shembati Microlot #11 - Fully Washed

Burundi: Shembati Microlot #11 - Fully Washed

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In the cup: Super complex sweetness! Smooth and super balanced. Slim and transparent, like a bucket of fresh tart berries. Tasting notes of bright citrus and orange.

Mouthfeel: Pleasant medium mouthfeel.

Cupping Score: 88

Variety: Red Bourbon

Process: Fully Washed

Washing Station: Shembati, 

Microlot: La Cumbre, Shade #13

Producer: Salum Ramadhan

Altitude: 1800 metres above sea leve

Background:

Shembati Washing Station is one of two washing stations built in 2016 by the producer Salum Ramadhan. Its located in the province of Kayanza in the hills of Butaganzwa commune. The site manager is a young guy called Ame Patrick. Its a medium sized washing station and they receive about 700 tons of cherry pr season.

He is systematically separating the coffees based on where they are grown, and by the date of processing. Post harvest we are cupping through some hundred samples to select the ones we find outstanding. They generally collect cherries from within a community, however the landscape in Burundi means the communities are situated in between hills and this can often create microclimates specific to each area.

He’s also investing in social and environmental projects such as education in the local areas, ponds for wastewater etc.

Picking and selection

The main harvest will normally start very slowly in March, peak around May (depending on altitude and weather) and end in July. The family members on the small farms are working the land, picking the coffee cherries themselves in the afternoon or on Saturdays. They will then either deliver the cherries to Shembati washing station by foot or bicycle, Salum can still pick up cherry with his truck but only when the farmer is within the newly regulated radius from the washing station.The farmers are free to deliver their cherries to anyone offering the highest price. And the competition in this area can be hard. Salum and his team will communicate with the local farmers on selective picking and sorting. To attract farmers with the best qualities they are constantly paying premiums above the market prices to improve the product.

Cherry reception

Bringing in cherries from the different collection points is expensive as the cost of transport in Burundi is high. Still, it has been good for quality as he have well trained staff, good capacity and infrastructure to produce micro lots.

Shembati washing station has strict routines for cherry reception. The coffees are sorted by the farmers at the receiving stations on raised tables, or they even have small flotation tank system for each farmer at delivery. They also have workers dedicated to sort out un ripe and over ripe coffees for their special preparation of micro lots. The pre processing flotation process is to first put the cherries in water tanks. They will then skim off the floaters and give it back to the farmer before the coffees are hand sorted to separate out unripe/half-ripe.